Helene Combe

Through my journey as an English teacher and a language learner

Students are not clients

I mean, in some sense, we can say that they are indeed clients, as most of them are paying to be in language classroom. I have been working for three years now in ELT, so I am still a baby teacher with a lot to learn, but here is something I would like to highlight: when it comes to education, there shouldn’t be a notion of clientele whatsoever.

Let me explain why I am ranting about this precise topic right here, right now. My college students had to take a written exam today (technically a mock exam), and one of them decided to email me right after, to tell me that it was incredibly difficult. It was not, I had used a past paper, I didn’t overcomplicate the matter, and it was totally manageable for a student who had worked correctly this year. But this precise student hadn’t, and sent me another email, five seconds after the first one, asking me how she was supposed to know all these things?!?

I did NOT send an email like “Gee, IDK, work a bit, for a change?”. I really wanted to, but I just sent her an official document which stated the level of the exam. But she is not the only one reacting this way, as a client: she is barely listening in class, she never opens her mouth and never does any homework BUT she expects some results, and good grades.

The reason is fairly simple: education as been seen as an industry like any other else for so long that our students truly believe that it is indeed one. Let me hear, loud and clear, education is NOT an industry. We can’t promise any precise success early on, we can’t sign a contract based on results. As teachers, we do our best to educate, to adapt, to overcome difficulties, but we CAN’T just implement our knowledge in our students’ skulls. We can’t say on September 1st that an A1 student will be B1 on March 23rd, because we can’t promise these things.

The problem, when you see education as a real industry, is that you start to see the finances behind it, the wheels of rentability, and the clients’ satisfactory rate. We can’t use these tools in education. Our students are sitting in a classroom, normally, because they want to learn English (or they are being forced to learn English, let’s be honest). Their motivations can be various (to get a better job, to pass an exam, to live in another country, whatever, all are valid) but they are here to LEARN, not to CONSUME. We cannot put knowledge in a can.

Another problem, when you think of education as an industry, is the quality. I have seen like a gazillion of ads saying “teacher wanted” with literally no requirements; except being a native speaker (when it comes to languages) or to hold a degree (any type of degree would be just fine, thank you very much). I told people, years ago, that I was studying to become a teacher, and most of the time, the reaction was the same “do you really have to study to teach? I mean, it’s not that hard. “

Not so long ago, being a teacher meant something. It still does, to me at least, and to a lot of people. I never regretted my choice to leave the real estate industry behind me; it was crooked, it was unhealthy, it was all about the money. But I was a bit naive when I started, and I hadn’t realized that education, not only ELT, had became an industry. We want our students to succeed, we want to give good grades at exams, but we won’t just because we are told to do so. Education still means something, at some point. And giving out good grades and exams, it’s just devaluating it. I am not saying it that we have to be harsh, and severe, for the sake of it, that’s actually the opposite. We have to find back our place, as educators. And Education, with a big “E”, must remain out of the business world.

3 Comments

  1. I have had this debate with myself. I can relate to some topics you raised in the article. Thanks for sharing this.

  2. Hi!
    I’m writing you from Sweden. I’m an American ESOL teacher with about 15 years experience and a Masters in TESOL behind me. I have tried several teaching contexts here in Sweden and been totally disillusioned by them all. Doing other work right now, but hoping to get back to teaching. Teaching immigrants in NYC was the best part of my working life so far. I just read your articles about not wanting to teach online and students not being clients. Hallelujah! You are a real teacher. That is clear. I am so grateful to hear someone say so plainly things that I also believe/feel and have been unable (or not brave enough) to articulate myself. Your words are a godsend. Thank you for putting them out there, and for saying things so damned clearly and plainly and straightforwardly that really any person should be able to understand that this is the truth. You made my day. Keep fighting the good fight friend. /Susan

    • hcombe

      2020-10-27 at 6:01 PM

      Hi Susan, thank you so much for your comment, even though due to technical problems, I see it only now. You made my day as well by writing this comment 🙂

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