Sorry not sorry. I know I am adding wood to the fire.

I find it pretty offensive to still read, in 2020, listed as a requirement for a TEFL job, right under the qualifications, “native speaker.”

Let me rephrase it. What I find deeply offensive is to consider that a passport, from a very specific country, is enough to offer someone a job. Do you realize how insane this situation is? People work for months, years, to become teachers only to hear “sorry we only hire native speakers”, most of the time said with a smirk.

And let’s be honest, when we hear “native speakers” you can be sure it implies “white.” The perfect ESL teacher, according to job ads, is white and is coming from 6 countries, because as we all know, only 6 countries in the entire world can speak English properly. And the problem is, a lot of people are actually okay with this. I can give hundreds of stories of white native speakers who decided to teach English to travel and came back home, happy to share travel stories and pics.

I am a white EFL teacher, and I know I got at least two jobs because the recruiter had no idea that I was a NNS. Did I say anything to make him change his mind? No. The most recent one realized that I was French only when I gave him my passport in order to prepare the contract, two days before the start of the semester. He never, ever mentioned the fact that he wanted a NS during our interview, but we had it over Skype in July 2018, when I was studying at Yale. He thought I was a damn NS, and I said NOTHING. Does it make me an accomplice of this whole scheme? Yes. Would I have had the job if I had mentioned my passport? No.

Since this interview, a lot of things changed. I now only present English as an International language, and myself as an English as a Foreign language teacher. I teach in France, I hold a French passport, my dad is actually Italian, I grew up with two cultures which are not English or American, why should I pretend that I arrived five minutes ago with my backpack? This cliché continues only because we allow it: if people were responsible enough not to answer to these jobs ads which require native speakers, they would have dried out. It’s easier said than done, I am aware.

As teachers, what can we do? We can start by shutting down the “I can’t believe you speak so well English!” and the “are you sure you’re not American?” (I have heard these ones quite a lot) in the teachers’ lounge. We can emphasize to our students that English is a global language, and that they will probably only speak English to another non-native speaker (80% of English interaction are between NNS – Crystal, 2018). We can explain to our students that English as a Second Language or a Foreign Language is not used the same way than as a Native Language. We can use a course book which is “NNS friendly”. And of course, we can refuse to apply to jobs who ask specifically for native speakers, even if you are indeed a NS.

As human beings, what can we do? We can start by, outside the classroom, praising people who are trying to speak the language instead of mocking them (I am not implying that a lot of you do that, but I have seen people mocking others). We can start seeing the beauty of knowledge instead of monetizing it. We can start by praising teachers instead of saying that everybody can do “that.” Not everybody can be passionate about teaching, like not everybody cannot be into accounting. We can start by acknowledging that being a teacher is a real, serious job, and that you don’t fail if you decide to make education your future.

I turned my back on a very promising career in real estate management to embrace one in ELT, and despite everything, the racism, the poor conditions, the shitty salary, I wouldn’t go back.

Bibliography:

Crystal, D. (2018) The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language. Cambridge: CUP